The Role of Nutrition in Promoting Healthier Crops

The Role of Nutrition in Promoting Healthier Crops

Well-balanced nutrition plays a key role in crop growth and development. There are many micronutrients essential for plant growth including boron, calcium, copper, manganese and zinc. However, deficiencies, biotic and abiotic factors can inhibit a crop’s ability to take in the nutrients it needs.

For example, high pH soils, high organic matter soils or light textured and sandy soils are all prone to zinc deficiency. Crops growing in zinc deficient soils may exhibit stunted growth and small or misshapen leaves. To help supplement zinc deficiency and promote robust crops, I recommend OMEX’s Zintake, a foliar fertilizer with high concentrations of phosphorus, potassium and zinc.

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Using Micronutrients in a Liquid Blend

Using Micronutrients in a Liquid Blend

To attain high yields, crops require a balanced ratio of macronutrients (NPK – nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) and micronutrients (zinc, copper, manganese, iron, boron, etc.) The correct amount of some nutrients and the limited supply of others can create imbalances and reduce yield potential.

However, the higher the yield a crop produces, the more nutrients it takes out of the soil. Today’s high-yielding crops remove more nutrients from the soil than ever, leading to issues of nutrient availability.

Weather also plays a part, with most micronutrients virtually unavailable in the cool/cold temperatures and wet soil conditions which are typical of spring across Western Canada. Using a liquid starter fertilizer at seeding time can help correct micronutrient deficiency in the soil, preventing common early-season deficiencies in crops and improving yields.

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Reducing Heat Stress with Boron

Reducing Heat Stress with Boron

Hot conditions in the prairies often coincide with crops gearing up for flowering. During this reproductive stage, the crop has an increasing demand for boron. Unfortunately, boron is immobile in the plant and cannot be stripped from vegetative tissues to fulfill the transient peak of demand of the flowers.

Boron is a key nutrient to successful pollination. When the conditions become hot and dry or hot with a high level of relative humidity, boron translocation becomes jeopardized. This can lead to a poor extension of the pollen tubes resulting in misses in the pods. We often hear about ‘heat blast’ or ‘pod abortion’, which a direct consequence of boron shortage at flowering time. Heat also shortens the flowering period and affect the activity of the pollinators

So, what can you do? Beat the heat with boron!

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OMEX Supports Local Producer for International Benefit

OMEX Supports Local Producer for International Benefit
Dr. Abdel El Hadrami at Art Enns's Manyinga Project-supporting canola field

We at OMEX believe in supporting agriculture education and the dedicated people around the world who help deliver it. In this spirit, we are proud to be a partner of the Manyinga Project, supporting Manitoba producer Art Enns in his effort to grow 40 acres of canola, the revenue from which he will donate to the project.

The Manyinga Project operates two schools for orphaned and vulnerable children in the Manyinga region of Zambia, Africa. Along with the state curriculum, the two schools teach the children to grow field crops, fruits, vegetables and to raise goats – all crucial life skills they will need to support themselves, since subsistence farming is the primary way of life in the Manyinga region.

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Help Minimize Hail Damage with Foliar Nutrition

Help Minimize Hail Damage with Foliar Nutrition

You can follow every recommendation and do everything by the book, but there’s one factor no one can control – and that’s the forces of nature. Hail is one such environmental factor that can cause significant physical damage to your crop.

Leaf tissue that’s been damaged by hail can’t take in sunlight to effectively complete photosynthesis, and energy production in the crop will stall, impeding growth. Physical damage also leaves plants more vulnerable to diseases and insects. Depending on the severity, a hail storm can significantly stunt plant growth and set back yields.

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