Nutrient Deficiency – Symptoms and Solutions

Nutrient Deficiency – Symptoms and Solutions

Crops require essential nutrients for healthy development and optimal growth. Various physiological functions such as photosynthesis, nutrient uptake, root growth and flowering all rely on nutrients. When plants don’t have enough of a specific nutrient they may display a range of symptoms, varying from morphological impairments (i.e. stunting), to chlorosis or necrosis, to premature seed set and ripening.

Deficiency in any given nutrient comes with the presentation a specific symptom or combination of symptoms. The expression and severity of symptoms varies, depending on how long the crop is left deficient.

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Seven Benefits of Stress Reliever Technology™

Seven Benefits of Stress Reliever Technology™

Many crops across Western Canada are suffering from early-season stress linked to cold and wet conditions, the inability of soil to transfer nutrients, pathogens, pests and weeds. This delicate time is also when herbicides are due to be applied, which can further stress the crop. At OMEX, we developed technology to help relieve stress on crops, and this technology is now the star feature of our Stress Reliever family of products including C3, P3 and Nutri-Boost. Stress Reliever Technology has seven measurable, positive effects on crops.

Enhancing Root Production

OMEX formulations with NPK, micropackage of trace elements and Stress Reliever Technology™ were designed to maximize nutrient uptake and translocation within the plant. The complex range of compounds found within our formulations help promote root formation especially when crops are under stress.

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Stress Reduction: How Can Plant Nutrition Help Stressed Crops?

Stress Reduction: How Can Plant Nutrition Help Stressed Crops?

Just like we can’t function at our best when we’re stressed out, crops can’t grow to their full potential and produce their maximum yields when they’re growing in stressful conditions.

It’s estimated that approximately 60 per cent of cultivated soils have nutrient deficiencies or other issues that create stressful growing conditions. Soil that’s too wet or too dry, cold spring temperatures, cold soil conditions, spring frost like we are seeing in parts of Saskatchewan this year and no pre-burn application are all factors that can lead to stressed-out crops. High performance plant nutrition can help your crop cope with stressful conditions and meet yield goals despite these challenges.

To help pulse crops bounce back from stress, I usually prescribe OMEX’s P3, a foliar with advanced calcium nutrition. Use P3 when applying herbicide to help the crop recover, encourage nodulation and advance maturity at the 1-6 node stage for peas and the 1-9 node stage for lentils and chickpeas.

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Help Your Crop Reach Maturity Faster

The growing season is already upon us and some folks are still harvesting last year’s crop or dealing with wet and soggy ground. Soils are also still cold. As I write this, the thermometer is indicating temperature below the ideal 5 degrees Celsius, and the forecast is calling for wind from the north to north east.

Soil temperature has many implications on nutrient availability to seedlings and emergence. For example, until soil temperatures reach at least 12 degrees Celsius, phosphorus, potassium and zinc are unavailable to the seed. The uptake of manganese, another important micronutrient for plant growth, is also impeded by cold soil.

OMEX Primers® were developed to provide the seed with enough nutrients to carry it to the 3–5 leaf stage when the root system is fully developed. These products are formulated to help the crop emerge quicker, better compete with weeds and access soil banded fertilizer early on.

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Water quality and burn-off or in-season spraying

Water quality and burn-off or in-season spraying

Water chemistry plays a large part in getting maximum efficacy from your herbicides during pre-season burn-off or in-season spraying. Tank mixing herbicides with hard water that has high pH levels can reduce their effectiveness, which can ultimately lead to less weed control and loss of yields.

The water from wells and dug-outs that’s often used on the farm is usually hard water. Testing for water hardness and pH level is a good place to start, and there’s a good chance the test will reveal it isn’t as soft as you’d like it to be.

Water hardness is measured in parts per million (ppm). Test results from 100–200 ppm indicate hard water, with anything over 160 ppm being very hard. The pH level of water for crop spraying shouldn’t exceed 7 on the pH scale. When the test reveals hard water and/or high pH levels, I always recommend a water conditioner to soften the water and lower its pH to make it more suitable for crop spraying.

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